• Other Financial Issues

    Podcast 16 January

    In this show Kevin and Kieran look at how Chelsea won the Europa League, finished in the top four domestically but still needed to borrow £247 million from Roman Abramovich as they racked up huge losses. Plus a look at what happens when UEFA ride into town, the situation at Southend where wages have gone unpaid, why Spanish and Italian games are being played in Riyadh and much more.

  • Other Financial Issues

    Podcast 13th January

    It’s another one of our listener’s questions (or should that be reader’s wives) shows in which we look at the demise of Chesterfield since relegation to the National League, whether another Leeds United style implosion could arise if a club leaves the Premier League and exactly what did (and did not) the auditors do at the FAI. https://podcasts.apple.com/gb/podcast/spireites-the-next-leeds-united-and-the-fai/id1482886394?i=1000462328392

  • Other Financial Issues

    Podcast 9 January 2020

    After UEFA reveals how much cash each club received for the group stages of this season’s Champions League, Kevin and Kieran find out who came out on top. Plus, with talk again of a European Super League in the future, they ask whether these figures effectively mean we have one already. They also look at the implications of Macclesfield’s latest points deduction and the mysterious case of Craig Dawson and the £2m fee. https://share.transistor.fm/s/d980e874

  • Other Financial Issues

    Podcast January 2nd

    In this episode we look at why Stoke City’s, owned by £65 billion a year in wagers Bet365 want FFP to be changed. We look at the price of opening your mouth, as Mesut Ozil upsets the Chinese state broadcaster who pay a lot of money for Premier League TV rights, Sunderland director Charlie Methven calls the club’s fans uneducated and a fan gets a ban from his own club for complaining about Manchester City’s owner’s human rights record. https://share.transistor.fm/s/09e9fc7f

  • Other Financial Issues

    Christmas Day Podcast

    Kevin and Kieran answer a load listeners’ questions, including where the fine paid by Leeds over ‘spygate’ ended up, whether Premier League clubs’ revenue is anywhere near its peak, and why the away club’s ticket money s often paid to the home club five days after the match. They also hand out the Price of Football podcast’s end-of-season awards and Kevin gives his tip for perfect Brussels sprouts on the big day.

  • Other Financial Issues

    Rangers and Celtic: Never Let Me Down

    Glasgow’s big two teams have  good starts to both domestic and Europa Cup campaigns so far this season and both have just announced their financial results for 2018/19. Everyone know that the rivalry between the clubs and especially their fans is intense,  but do the accounts give the likes of @BearNecessities1872 and @PopeAndGlory on Twitter more point scoring opportunities against each other? Revenue Revenue for clubs is generated from three sources, matchday, broadcasting and commercial. Relative to the rest of Scottish football, where many clubs are so small, they are not legally obliged to show income and expenses in their accounts, Celtic and Rangers dominate as would be expected. All…

  • Other Financial Issues

    Bristol City 2018/19: Empty Skies

    Introduction: Life in the Championship is tough, and Bristol City’s latest financial results are testament to that as playoff hopes were dashed and the club lost a lot of money on a day to day basis. Every cloud has a silver lining and City’s impressive player recruitment and talent spotting allowed the club to reverse these losses due to player sales that generated £38 million profits. Even so, the club needed the benevolence of owner Stephen Lansdown to keep its head above water as he continued to pump money into City. Key figures for year to 31 May 2019: Bristol City Holdings Ltd Income £30.3 million (up 20%). Wages £30.6…

  • Other Financial Issues

    Bury: Another brick in the wall

    Overview The company has taken advantage of legislation for small businesses to avoid publishing full financial statements. This means that there is no profit and loss account or income/wage details. No accounts have been published for the year ended 31 May 2018, in breach of company law, making the directors guilty of a criminal offence. Losses accelerated for the company from 2013 onwards, following the acquisition of the club by Stewart Day. In the two years when the club did publish fuller sets of accounts, wages exceeded income. Income details Bury’s income increased in 2015/6 and 2016/7 when the club was in League One. This is partially due to increased…

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    Football Finances: Serpent’s Kiss

    Out of 92 football clubs in the Premier League and the EFL, 61 made a net loss in their most recent accounts. The total losses made by those clubs came to £589 million and that’s after some, especially those in the Premier League, receiving the riches of bumper TV and sponsorship deals as well as player sales. Manchester United’s losses are distorted by Trump related tax changes in the US, where the company’s shares are traded, but it’s noticeable that all three clubs relegated that season lost money too. In the Championship loss making is the norm, with the three promoted clubs in 2017/18 being in the top five loss…

  • Other Financial Issues

    Bury: Minutes to Midnight

    Summer 1976 and I’m gathered around a bed with my mum and my eleven-year-old sister, watching my dad, full of tubes, breath slower and slower. The priest has just given him the last rites, the consultant has just explained he’s done all he can, my mum is weeping, I’m holding my sister’s hand. Even then I was obsessed with numbers and I’m staring at the heart rate monitor, watching it count down and hoping for a miracle*. Very sad you might say, but why the melodrama, and what the Dickens has this got to do with Bury football club? Emotional blackmail this isn’t though, Bury fans are watching their own…